Posted by: 4pack | August 13, 2009

Ideal Shape And Weight: Americans Overvalue Exercise And It Has Directly Resulted In The Current “Obesity Epidemic”

 FOUR PACKS HAS BEEN POUNDING THE TABLE (THE DINNER TABLE) ABOUT THE FACT THAT IDEAL SHAPE AND WEIGHT-LOSS MANAGEMENT MUST BE 80% DIET AND 20% EXERCISE…THE WRONG KIND OF EXERCISE (WHICH IS MOST EXERCISE) STIMULATES HUNGER AND OGGIES WILL OVEREAT WHILE RATIONALIZING THAT THEY “BURNED OFF” THE EXTRA CALORIES…WRONG!!!! …READ ON BELOW
The Myth About Exercise Time Magazine

One of the most widely accepted, commonly repeated assumptions in our culture is that if you exercise, you will lose weight...The basic problem is that while it's true that exercise burns calories and that you must burn calories to lose weight, exercise has another effect: it can stimulate hunger. That causes us to eat more, which in turn can negate the weight-loss benefits we just accrued. Exercise, in other words, isn't necessarily helping us lose weight. It may even be making it harder.

It’s a question many of us could ask. More than 45 million Americans now belong to a health club, up from 23 million in 1993. We spend some $19 billion a year on gym memberships. Of course, some people join and never go. Still, as one major study — the Minnesota Heart Survey — found, more of us at least say we exercise regularly. The survey ran from 1980, when only 47% of respondents said they engaged in regular exercise, to 2000, when the figure had grown to 57%.

And yet obesity figures have risen dramatically in the same period: a third of Americans are obese, and another third count as overweight by the Federal Government’s definition. Yes, it’s entirely possible that those of us who regularly go to the gym would weigh even more if we exercised less. But like many other people, I get hungry after I exercise, so I often eat more on the days I work out than on the days I don’t. Could exercise actually be keeping me from losing weight? (Watch TIME’s video “How to Lose Hundreds of Pounds.”)

The conventional wisdom that exercise is essential for shedding pounds is actually fairly new. As recently as the 1960s, doctors routinely advised against rigorous exercise, particularly for older adults who could injure themselves. Today doctors encourage even their oldest patients to exercise, which is sound advice for many reasons: People who regularly exercise are at significantly lower risk for all manner of diseases — those of the heart in particular. They less often develop cancer, diabetes and many other illnesses. But the past few years of obesity research show that the role of exercise in weight loss has been wildly overstated. (Read “Losing Weight: Can Exercise Trump Genes?”)

“In general, for weight loss, exercise is pretty useless,” says Eric Ravussin, chair in diabetes and metabolism at Louisiana State University and a prominent exercise researcher. Many recent studies have found that exercise isn’t as important in helping people lose weight as you hear so regularly in gym advertisements or on shows like The Biggest Loser — or, for that matter, from magazines like this one.

The basic problem is that while it’s true that exercise burns calories and that you must burn calories to lose weight, exercise has another effect: it can stimulate hunger. That causes us to eat more, which in turn can negate the weight-loss benefits we just accrued. Exercise, in other words, isn’t necessarily helping us lose weight. It may even be making it harder.

http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,1914857,00.html

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