Posted by: 4pack | March 5, 2009

“Ideal Shape”: Measuring Men’s Waist Circumference Might Be Superior To And Should Be Done In Addition To Body Mass Index (BMI) Is Accepted In “Assessing The Risk Of Death” By Medical Experts

 FOUR PACKS WANTS TO MAINTAIN IT’S HIGH LEVEL OF “CREDIBILITY” BY DEMONSTRATING THAT IT REVIEWS THE LATEST SCIENTIFIC AND MEDICAL RESEARCH COMING OUT ON OGGIES’ HEALTH ISSUES…THIS POST SHOWS THAT THE CENTRAL PREMISE OF “OBSERVED OVERALL HEALTH” OF MEN IS THE AMOUNT OF VISCERAL (I.E. BELLY FAT) FAT AROUND A MAN’S WAIST…AND DETERMINING WHERE TO MEASURE THE “GIRTH” IS PARAMOUNT…newenglandjournalofmedicine

“to measure waist circumference, locate the top of the right iliac crest. Place a measuring tape in a horizontal plane around the abdomen at the level of the iliac crest. Before reading the tape measure, ensure that the tape is snug but does not compress the skin and is parallel to the floor. Measurement is made at the end of a normal expiration.”

My recent study and a meta-analysis, both of which used cross-sectional data, provide support for the superiority of measures of central obesity — especially waist-to-height ratio — over BMI for discriminating the presence or absence of cardiologic and metabolic risk factors.

To the Editor: A challenging issue with the study reported on by Pischon et al. (Nov. 13 issue) is where to measure the waist. The accepted standard for measuring the waist circumference put forth by the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES III) protocol, as noted by Mahley in the Williams Textbook of Endocrinology, is: “to measure waist circumference, locate the top of the right iliac crest. Place a measuring tape in a horizontal plane around the abdomen at the level of the iliac crest. Before reading the tape measure, ensure that the tape is snug but does not compress the skin and is parallel to the floor. Measurement is made at the end of a normal expiration.” However, Pischon et al. report that in their study, “waist circumference was measured either at the narrowest circumference of the torso or at the midpoint between the lower ribs and the iliac crest.” International acceptance of measurement tools is paramount.
Margaret M. Gaglione, M.D.
Tidewater Bariatrics
Chesapeake, VA 23320

doctor@twb4u.com

 

 

 

 

 To the Editor: Pischon et al. support the use of waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio in addition to body-mass index (BMI) in assessing the risk of death. Engeland et al. found that height is inversely associated with mortality among men and to some degree among women. My recent study and a meta-analysis, both of which used cross-sectional data, provide support for the superiority of measures of central obesity — especially waist-to-height ratio — over BMI for discriminating the presence or absence of cardiologic and metabolic risk factors. Pischon et al. appropriately adjusted for height when calculating the mortality risk associated with anthropometric indexes. It would be helpful if the authors would determine the relative risk of death according to waist-to-height ratio and its comparison with other anthropometric data. For a fair comparison, height should not be adjusted for other studied anthropometric indexes. Pischon et al. indicated that they observed no significant association between hip circumference and mortality risk. Larger hip circumference was shown to be an independent predictor of a lower mortality rate in a Swedish female cohort. Did Pischon et al. confirm that?
Ahmet Selçuk Can, M.D.
Gayrettepe Florence Nightingale Hospital
34349 Istanbul, Turkey
 
 
 
 

 

 

selcukcan@endokrinoloji.com

 
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