Posted by: 4pack | January 15, 2009

“Ideal Diet” Update: Sugar Content And Sources Should Be Disclosed On Food Label Along With More Accurate Portion Disclosure

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE DIET AND THEREFORE IS ALL ABOUT CALORIES AND FOOD TYPES…MORE TRANSPARENCY IS NEEDED IN FOOD LABELING…PLEASE READ EXCERPTS BELOW:

sugar

“…total sugar content should be subdivided into added sugars, from sources like cane juice and high-fructose corn syrup, and naturally occurring sugars, from whole foods like fruit and milk…”

http://www.usnews.com/blogs/on-fitness/2008/10/17/8-fixes-nutritionists-want-on-food-labels.html

Make serving sizes realistic. These can be misleading if they don’t reflect actual habits. Christopher Gardner, a nutrition scientist at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, suggests that if the package were given to 100 people, the serving size should reflect what the average person actually ate. And use ounces and cups rather than grams, adds Heather Bauer, founder of Nu-Train, a nutrition counseling center in New York City and author of The Wall Street Diet.

Give a percentage daily value for sugar. Right now there is no ceiling for recommended sugar consumption. There should be, says Gardner. He and Jayne Hurley, senior nutritionist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, also recommend that the total sugar content should be subdivided into added sugars, from sources like cane juice and high-fructose corn syrup, and naturally occurring sugars, from whole foods like fruit and milk.

Require that caffeine content be listed. It’s found in products you may not expect, like coffee ice cream. And many people are sensitive to even small amounts, says Tara Gidus, a nutrition performance coach and ADA spokesperson. For the same reason, the amount of artificial sweeteners should be listed, she says.

• Give more information about whole grains. The amount of whole grains in a product can be difficult to figure out, Hurley and Gidus say. They recommended the amount in grams and percentage of the food be added. Same with fruit, says Hurley: If a product’s name mentions fruit, its label should tell exactly how much is really fruit. It’s found in products you may not expect, like coffee ice cream. And many people are sensitive to even small amounts, says Tara Gidus, a nutrition performance coach and ADA spokesperson. For the same reason, the amount of artificial sweeteners should be listed, she says.

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