Posted by: 4pack | January 13, 2009

“Ideal Diet” Update: The Importance of Protein For Men Over 40 Is Key To Health, Metabolism And Quality Of Life

PROTEIN..PROTEIN…PROTEIN….WE CANNOT STATE THE FACT THAT OGGIES MUST INCREASE PROTEIN INTAKE FROM ALL SOURCES ENOUGH…LOSS OF MUSCLE MASS IS A FACT OF LIFE AS YOU AGE AND YOU MUST INCREASE PROTEIN ALONG WITH MAINTAIN MUSCLE THROUGH CORE EXERCISE AND WEIGHTS…READ BELOW FOR GREAT EXCERPTS…

proteinsources

Aging also makes the body less effective at absorbing vitamin B-12. Underbakke said less stomach acid means the vitamin cannot be separated from the protein contained in animal products, hence it doesn’t get into the body, where it is necessary for the formation of blood and the health of nerves. Vitamin B-12 deficiency can lead to anemia.

Protein helps keep the body’s muscles functioning. This is crucial because, with age, muscles lose substantial mass. While muscles are obviously necessary for moving around, they also are vital to posture and maintaining good balance, which becomes more difficult the older people get…

But because the body’s muscles, which burn more calories than fat tissue, lose mass, older people simply need fewer calories. By the time people are in their 60s, they need about 400 fewer calories a day to maintain themselves

 

http://www.jsonline.com/features/health/37447334.html

Older people face a dilemma – they need to maintain their intake of protein and other important nutrients in the face of a declining need for calories.

Aging is marked often by a loss of interest in food as our senses of smell and taste decline. Yet it is crucial, say dietitians and nutritionists, for older people to keep up their intake of protein, even though “most elderly just don’t feel like eating much protein,” said Caroline Apovian, a physician with Boston University and director of the university’s Center for Nutrition and Weight Management.

Protein helps keep the body’s muscles functioning. This is crucial because, with age, muscles lose substantial mass. While muscles are obviously necessary for moving around, they also are vital to posture and maintaining good balance, which becomes more difficult the older people get, according to Julie Jones, professor of nutrition at the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul, Minn.

But because the body’s muscles, which burn more calories than fat tissue, lose mass, older people simply need fewer calories. By the time people are in their 60s, they need about 400 fewer calories a day to maintain themselves, Jones said.

She and other experts, such as geriatric medicine specialist John Morley of St. Louis University Medical School, explained that seniors need foods that are nutritionally dense – ones that pack a lot of protein into small quantities, without excess calories.

Sources of protein

Protein is a high priority for older people, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison clinical dietitian Gail Underbakke.

“If you don’t have enough calories in your diet, then the protein that you do eat is burned for energy,” she said.

Where to get that protein can be a problem. Meat is one obvious source, but it can pose digestive difficulties, since the amount of digestive stomach acid that the body produces declines with age. Many older people also have dental problems, making chewing difficult.

Underbakke recommends other sources of protein that can help avoid such problems: Beans and an old standby, peanut butter, are two options.

Dairy products are another protein source. But many people develop lactose intolerance as they age, making digesting milk and other products somewhat difficult. This problem has solutions, though.

“We’re fortunate that there are many lactose-free products on the market, plus you can buy lactase,” the enzyme that breaks down lactose, said Alice Lichtenstein, a researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston.

The calcium contained in dairy products is also vital for the health of bones in both men and women, nutritionists said. Lichtenstein added that the calcium levels needed to maintain bone health increase with age.

Mind your vitamins

Vitamin D is necessary for the body to absorb calcium, and, nutritionists said, many older people simply don’t get enough of the vitamin, which can be provided by sunlight. The problem is particularly acute in the Upper Midwest, where winters prevent many people from spending enough time outside. Hence, older people probably need a vitamin D supplement.

Aging also makes the body less effective at absorbing vitamin B-12. Underbakke said less stomach acid means the vitamin cannot be separated from the protein contained in animal products, hence it doesn’t get into the body, where it is necessary for the formation of blood and the health of nerves. Vitamin B-12 deficiency can lead to anemia. Physicians should assess vitamin B-12 status, nutritionists said.

Vitamin B-12 supplements, however, can tackle deficiency, since the body can absorb the vitamin in this form.

One-third of Americans are obese, according to 2006 statistics by the federal government’s National Center for Health Statistics. For older people, obesity and being overweight also are concerns, nutritionists said.

As taste and smell sensitivity declines with age, foods high in sugar and salt can be particularly appealing but also add unneeded pounds.

Underbakke and others noted, however, that a slight increase in weight can be associated with health in the elderly.

On the flip side, weight loss can be a significant problem in older people, said physicians such as Morley and Michael Malone of Aurora Health Care. Medications can be responsible for the loss of appetite and consequently weight, Malone said.

Medications for depression and bladder control, common drugs used by older people, can cause dry mouth.

“When you have a dry mouth, your ability to produce saliva is decreased; therefore your taste may be a bit impaired, your swallowing may not be as good and your chewing is not as good,” said Malone, medical director for Aurora Senior Services and Aurora Visiting Nurse Association of Wisconsin.

He said in such situations physicians should look critically at a patient’s medications and consider their risks and benefits.

At times, Malone said, it may be necessary to temporarily stop the use of such drugs.

 

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Responses

  1. I recently blogged about Eating And Exerciseand got some pretty cool feedback. Here’s a snippet…

    “Eating after you exercise is just as important as your pre-workout meal. Anytime you exercise, whether its cardio or resistance, you deplete energy in the form of glycogen.”

    Feel free to poke around my blog and leave a comment. Us quality bloggers have to stick together!

    Easy Ways To Exercise

    Peace,
    A

  2. visit my site formore about diet


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