Posted by: 4pack | December 23, 2008

“Ideal Diet” Update: New Diet Books All Seek To Reduce Calorie Intake While Recommending High Water Content Foods That Are Low In Calorie Density

EAT THE RIGHT FOODS, EVERY THREE HOURS AND KEEP TOTAL CALORIES UNDER 2,000 PER DAY…”VOLUMETRICS” LOOKS LIKE A VERY GOOD BOOK BUT IT IS JUST RESTATING THE OBVIOUS …IT’S ALL ABOUT THE CALORIE INTAKE AND EATING THE RIGHT FOODS WITHIN THAT 2,000 CALORIE REGIMEN…THE FOOD CHOICES ARE IN THE “MEDITERRANEAN DIET”…READ EXERPTS BELOW:

9780060932725

If physical hunger were the only thing driving overeating, it is unlikely that 60 percent of Americans would be overweight. Rather, many of us have lost touch with natural hunger and satiety signals, and we overeat in response to emotional and external cues.

“The Volumetrics Eating Plan: Techniques and Recipes for Feeling Full on Fewer Calories,” emphasizes getting more for less — meals that include filling foods like soups, salads, vegetables and fruits that on a volume basis are naturally low in calorie density because they have a high water content.

 http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/23/health/23brod.html?_r=1&ref=science&pagewanted=print

Science-based improvements in the diet-book genre began about five years ago with the publication of “The Volumetrics Weight-Control Plan: Feel Full on Fewer Calories,” by Barbara J. Rolls and Robert A. Barnett (HarperCollins). Dr. Rolls, chairwoman of the Department of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State University, shunned specific diet plans and instead developed an approach to eating based on her findings from numerous clinical studies that people need a certain volume or weight of food to feel satisfied.

Accordingly, the “volumetrics” plan, spelled out in a follow-up book, “The Volumetrics Eating Plan: Techniques and Recipes for Feeling Full on Fewer Calories,” emphasizes getting more for less — meals that include filling foods like soups, salads, vegetables and fruits that on a volume basis are naturally low in calorie density because they have a high water content.

But as most dieters know, eating habits that lead to weight gain, a failure to lose weight or an inability to maintain weight loss are as much a matter of mind as of body. If physical hunger were the only thing driving overeating, it is unlikely that 60 percent of Americans would be overweight. Rather, many of us have lost touch with natural hunger and satiety signals, and we overeat in response to emotional and external cues.

Of course, the modern epidemic of overweight and obese adults didn’t spring up overnight — for many people, weight problems have their origins in childhood. Last year, Dr. David S. Ludwig, pediatrician and endocrinologist at Children’s Hospital in Boston, tackled the underpinnings of the nation’s weight problems in “Ending the Food Fight: Guide Your Children to a Healthy Weight in a Fast Food/Fake Food World” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).

Dr. Ludwig, whose research focuses on how food affects hormones, metabolism and body weight regulation, has published more than 75 articles in medical or scientific journals. He is the founding director of the Optimal Weight for Life program, or OWL, at Children’s Hospital. His approach emphasizes foods that are digested and absorbed more slowly than high glycemic foods like white bread, white rice, highly processed cereals and concentrated sugars that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar and lead to a sugar-hormone “roller coaster” that drives hunger.

But Dr. Ludwig recognizes that some foods that have a high glycemic index in the laboratory, like carrots, do not have a high glycemic effect in the body when consumed in normal amounts.

Unlike most fast foods and highly processed foods, the meals and snacks recommended by Dr. Ludwig are rich in nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, minimally processed grains (like brown rice and steel-cut oats), wholesome fats like olive oil and avocado, and protein, including vegetable protein.

Dieting by Instinct

Perhaps the most comprehensive approach to eating for effective weight control is offered in a book to be published next month by Workman, “The Instinct Diet: Use Your Five Food Instincts to Lose Weight and Keep It Off,” by Susan B. Roberts and Betty Kelly Sargent.

Dr. Roberts is a professor of nutrition and psychiatry at Tufts University in Boston and the author of nearly 200 articles published in research journals. She explains how natural hard-wired instincts to eat in response to hunger, availability, caloric density, familiarity and variety, which served us well in paleolithic times (and until the mid-20th century), have been compromised by changes in the kinds, amounts and constancy of foods in the modern world. These changes, in turn, undermine the ability of many people to maintain a normal weight.

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Responses

  1. Thanks very much for your article about weight control…

    I have bookmarked this page for any future posts you might add about this topic again.

    Thanks,
    Nigel

  2. I have given up on the old calorie counting game. the body just hybonates. 2000 calories is good though. It isnt often about just hunger most of the time it is about fancying something nice to eat (proberbly Greed)

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