Posted by: 4pack | November 28, 2008

Obesity Update: Obama Administration Is Given “The Skinny?” By The Public Health Advocacy Institute (PHAI)

FOUR PACKS IS POSTING THIS “PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT” (PSA)…PRESIDENT-ELECT OBAMA, WHO IS IN VERY GOOD SHAPE (IN FACT, HE IS CONSIDERED SKINNY), IS BEING ADVISED TO GET THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INVOLVED IN GETTING PEOPLE TO “CLOSE THEIR MOUTHS” TO A SECOND (AND THIRD, AND FOURTH) HELPING OF BAD FOOD…TALK ABOUT “PUTTING OUR TAXPAYER DOLLARS WHERE OBESE PEOPLES MOUTH’S ARE”…READ SOME OF THE SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS BELOW:

 

 

 

 

NEW FEDERAL APPROACHES TO OBESITY EPIDEMIC NEEDED:

Public Health Advocacy Institute at Northeastern University School of Law Provides Obama Transition Team with Legal and Policy Recommendations

1) Recommendation – Presidentelect Obama should issue an Executive Order directing all executive branch agencies to expressly consider the impact of all major federal legislation on the obesity epidemic, similar to Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898 issued in 1994.

2) Recommendation: Develop and support an array of federal policies to increase access to healthy food at the state and local levels, including: an Innovations Fund to support grocery store development, new cooperatives, local entrepreneurship, and requirements for electronic payment access in all retail food environments, including farmers markets.

3) Recommendation: Amend the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act in the 2009 reauthorization to require physical education (PE) as a core subject, while increasing support of current core subjects.

5) Recommendation: Prioritize TOD development in all housing programs and ensure that eligibility criteria include affordability of home/rent prices; siting in low income, underserved communities; community design features that promote safety and safe walking and biking and mixed use development.

6) Recommendation: Restore civil rights protections under Title VI and its regulations to permit disparate discriminatory impact lawsuits against the recipients of federal funds (i.e., schools and parks) to increase the availability of and access to safe settings for physical exercise in lowincome and minority communities.

7) Recommendation: Create and use a federal mechanism (i.e., funding) to require enforcement of state physical education laws.

8) Recommendation Authorize the use of Food Stamp Nutrition Funds to promote strategies that will increase access to healthy foods and physical activity in lowincome communities.

10) Recommendation: Impose federal taxes (sales or excise) on purchases foods and beverages and earmark the revenue for obesity programs.

11) Recommendation: Develop a cultural program elevate the social value of tasty, healthy food.

13) Recommendation: Initiate a mediated public dialogue – including consumers, nutrition experts and the food industry – about reduced portion sizes as a tool for reducing caloric intake of the population.

14) Recommendation: Include and facilitate opportunities and mechanisms for daily physical activity (i.e., walking, bicycling) in all built environment projects.

15) Recommendation: Prohibit and remove all commercial promotion of food in all schools and educational settings receiving federal funds.

16) Recommendation: Eliminate all “competitive foods” from schools; restrict food sold and served in schools to the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs.

17) Recommendation: Establish and implement financial incentives for schools (e.g., Connecticut Health Food Certification model) to improve and promote enhanced nutrition standards in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

18) Recommendation: Require the Child and Adult Care Feeding Program to adopt the nutrition standards of Head Start for child care sites and to develop best feeding practices consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations.

19) Recommendation: Shift jurisdiction and authority over federal meal programs (i.e., National School Breakfast/Lunch Programs) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

21) Recommendation: Require federal food programs to align with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines and provide the necessary federal resources (i.e., reimbursement, commodities and incentives) to achieve alignment.

22) Recommendation: Expand the reach of federal food programs by automatically enrolling lowincome individuals and families already meanstested and found eligible for other public assistance programs.

28) Recommendation: Include reimbursement for preventive care related to obesity, such as nutrition therapy, in the Medicaid program as a structured benefit or through a disease management program for obesity.

29) Recommendation: Increase food stamp benefits sufficiently to insure that low income beneficiaries have adequate resources to purchase healthy food.

30) Recommendation: Reimburse after school programs through federal food programs for nutritious meals served after lunch when child care extends into the late afternoon or evening hours.

35) Recommendation: Amend federal law to clarify that factual information about calories or nutrients provided to consumers by restaurants are not “claims” subject to preemption by the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (NLEA).

36) Recommendation: Support adoption of a federal law requiring disclosure of calories on menus, menu boards and item tags  

  ONLY IF (a) more stringent state and local lawsare not preempted;

(b) alternative placement of calorie information (beyond menus,  menu boards and item tags) is not permitted and

   
(c) drive through eateries and food chains with 10 or more outlets are included.
 

 

 

 

37) Recommendation: Provide federal support in the form of funding, technical assistance and public and food industry education to implement and evaluate state and local menu labeling laws.

38) Recommendation: Maintain and expand federal support for projects that make routine walking and bicycling easier and more visible forms of transportation, especially in underserved areas.

39) Recommendation: Build support for increasing physical activity through transportation policy by making the links between public health goals and transportation funding guidelines more explicit.

40) Recommendation: Improve data tracking and monitoring systems including access for federally funded transportation programs that support walking and bicycling to facilitate transparent assessment of how federal transportation dollars support public health goals.

41) Recommendation: Evaluate obesity policy proposals to ensure they will improve the conditions that give rise to and sustain obesity related disease in both children and adults.

42) Recommendation: Enact policies that create healthpromoting environments for children and adults to improve the environments in which they live, study, play and work in order to support healthy eating and active living.

43) Recommendation: Increase federal National Institutes of Health funding for nutrition research.

44) Recommendation: Adopt an integrative, familybased approach to obesity treatment and prevention (i.e., focus on encouraging active family living throughout the day rather than simply promoting individual exercise).

45) Recommendation: Provide Centers for Disease Control federal funding to support obesity health policy development, lead health education efforts and strengthen the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

46) Recommendation: Create mechanisms for legal sharing of public health information and data between state agencies that protects security, privacy and confidentiality of information while advancing public health goals (i.e., add a carefully tailored exception for public health data collection to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to facilitate obesity prevention programs in schools).

47) Recommendation: Encourage states and localities to continue to develop and test innovative strategies to prevent and reverse the obesity epidemic; hence avoid including preemption provisions in federal laws that could impact the obesity epidemic.

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