Posted by: 4pack | November 26, 2008

“Historically Ideal Diet” Update: Lord Admiral Nelson Had His Men Eat “Meat Fat” And Fruit

FOUR PACKS WILL CITE HISTORICAL FIGURES WHO MADE HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT DIET RECOMMENDATIONS…IN THIS CASE LORD NELSON MADE THE CALL IN 1805 FOR MORE “RAISIN AND SUET” (WHICH IS RAW BEEF OR MUTTON FAT)…PROVING THAT SERVINGS OF FATTY MEAT AND FRUIT WERE IDEAL EVEN THEN…IF THE BRITISH ADMIRALTY SAW THE BENEFITS OF RATIONED FAT AND MEAT/MUTTON, HOW COULD OUR ESTEEMED MEDICAL/HEALTH COMMUNITY DEVISE THE NOW “REPUDIATED” FOOD PYRAMID IN THE LATE 1950’S AND 60’S…WHICH QUITE POSSIBLY IS RESPONSIBLE, MORE THAN ANY OTHER SINGLE FACTOR, FOR OUR CURRENT OBESITY EPIDEMIC….

“Nelson’s letter would have referred to raisins, or possibly currants, as both could be stored for months at a time. It was standard practice to stock ships up with such dried fruit.”

Suet is raw beef or mutton fat, especially the hard fat found around the loins and kidneys.

“Not only did he make tactical and strategic decisions of great importance, he cared about his men and made sure they were well provisioned.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/3525102/Lord-Nelsons-Trafalgar-diet-extra-suet-and-raisins.html 

The Vice-Admiral made sure his sailors went into the clash with full bellies, helping to ensure victory despite being outnumbered by the Franco-Spanish fleet.

The letter, recently donated to the Norfolk Nelson Museum in Great Yarmouth by an anonymous benefactor, reveals the asked a supply vessel for more raisins and suet one week before the big day, in 1805.

The suet could have been used in a main meal, or the ingredients could have been combined to make a steamed suet and fruit pudding similar to Spotted Dick.

Lord Nelson’s brief note, dated October 14, 1805, was written from the warship HMS Minotaur to the purser of the HMS Ajax, A Jackson. Part of it reads: ‘Supply the Minotaur with one…suet and fruit.’

James Davey, of the Greenwich Maritime Institute, said: “Nelson’s letter would have referred to raisins, or possibly currants, as both could be stored for months at a time. It was standard practice to stock ships up with such dried fruit.”

Nelson’s request, which had been stuck to a piece of card, will go on display at the Norfolk museum in January in an exhibition about the admiral.

Faith Carpenter, museum curator, said: “I think this letter shows that Lord Nelson was a master of command and logistics.

“Not only did he make tactical and strategic decisions of great importance, he cared about his men and made sure they were well provisioned.”

Lord Nelson died in the battle aboard HMS Victory. His fleet was supplied by a string of yards in Plymouth, Portsmouth, Deptford and Great Yarmouth.

Most sailors’ meals consisted of oatmeal and salt, biscuits and cheese or butter and large amounts of beer.

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