Posted by: 4pack | October 18, 2008

Indian Diet Producing Diabetes and Hypertension

PROVING YET AGAIN THAT EATING THE “RIGHT” FOODS IN “MODERATION” IS THE KEY…RESEARCH IS SHOWING THAT THE BASIC INDIAN DIET, FULL OF VEGETABLES AND FISH, IS PRODUCING DIABETES AND HYPERTENSION…THIS CAN ONLY COME FROM IMPROPER EATING HABITS….READ EXCERPTS BELOW:

“We have reviewed all kind of literature available and have seen that there is a great imbalance in Indian diet. What should be consumed in good amount is consumed less and what should be consumed less is in excess,”

Rice and wheat (in bread forms) are the staple foods of India. The food of India is extremely diverse, as ingredients, spices and cooking methods all vary from region to region. Spicy food and sweets are popular in India.

 http://www.indianexpress.com/story_print.php?storyid=374403

In a severe criticism of the average Indian diet, a study in the coming edition of the prestigious British Journal of Nutrition says that the nutritional imbalance in it is one of the reasons for the increasing cases of diabetes and hypertension in the country. Hypertension is usually an accompanying condition in diabetes and is often present in Type 2 diabetes as part of the metabolic syndrome of insulin resistance.

The study, which reviews the influence of dietary nutrients on insulin resistance — also called the metabolic syndrome — in Asian Indians and South Asians, says that there are severe imbalances in the average Indian diet. Data pertaining to nutrient intake, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians and South Asians has been reviewed and dietary imbalances have been reported in the following areas: low intake of MUFA, n-3 PUFA and fibre, and high intake of fats, saturated fats, carbohydrates and transfatty acids (mostly related to the widespread use of vanaspati, a hydrogenated oil). Data suggests that these nutrient imbalances are associated with insulin resistance and a changed lipid profile.

“We have reviewed all kind of literature available and have seen that there is a great imbalance in Indian diet. What should be consumed in good amount is consumed less and what should be consumed less is in excess,” said Dr Anoop Misra, HoD, Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Fortis Hospital, New Delhi, who conducted the study in collaboration with Centre for Diabetes, Obesity, and Cholesterol Disorders (C-DOC), Diabetes Foundation and Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences.

The problem is particularly severe in children and young individuals — a high intake of n-6 PUFA (mostly in fats) is correlated with glucose intolerance — whereas in adults, a high-carbohydrate meal consumption was reported to cause insulin resistance. Dietary supplements with n-3 PUFA lead to an improved lipid profile but not insulin sensitivity. Inadequate maternal nutrition during pregnancy, low birth weight and childhood ‘catch-up’ obesity may be important for the development of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

Even among the rural population, which usually consumes a traditional frugal diet, there is an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome due to changes in diets and lifestyle

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