Posted by: 4pack | September 28, 2008

“Low-Glycemic Diet” Paradox: No Weight Loss Unless Total Calories Restricted

THE PROBLEM WITH ANY GOVERNMENTAL “EDUCATION” ON HEALTHY FOODS AND DIETS WILL ALWAYS BE THE PREMISS OF “CHOICES”…”CHOICES” OF LOW-GLYCEMIC FOODS ARE GREAT UNTIL DISCIPLINE GOES LACKING…YOU MUST KEEP DAILY CALORIC INTAKE BELOW 2,000 CALORIES…PERIOD…THE OBESITY EPIDEMIC, AS THE WORLD IS WANT TO CALL IT, WILL NEVER REVERSE IN A MEANINGFUL WAY UNTIL “PORTION CONTROL” AND “CALORIE RESTRICTION” ARE INCORPORATED INTO THE LANGUAGE…WE ARE WHAT WE EAT…READ EXCERPTS BELOW FROM A VERY GOOD L.A. TIMES ARTICLE:

           OR      …WRONG!

“The other review, of 45 relevant clinical trials, concluded that eating a low-glycemic diet appeared to help people with diabetes, namely by improving blood sugar control. But it also concluded that there was minimal evidence that a diet low on the glycemic scale could help people lose weight.”

http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-nutrition29-2008sep29,0,4456644.story

The idea that a low-glycemic diet could improve health — namely by stabilizing blood sugar and thus preventing overeating — originated with researchers at the University of Toronto in the 1980s and has been most extensively developed (and promoted) by scientists at the University of Sydney in Australia.

The thinking behind the diet is easily summarized: different carbohydrates are metabolized differently in the human body. Some are digested slowly, causing relatively modest, gradual changes in blood sugar levels. Others, meanwhile, are quickly digested and cause blood sugar to peak and plummet rapidly and dramatically after a meal — and hunger to set in again quickly.

About a decade ago, several small studies suggested that a diet of mostly low-glycemic foods might help with weight loss. In one study, pregnant women on high-glycemic diets gained more weight by the time they gave birth than women who ate low-glycemic diets. In another, obese women on a low-glycemic diet lost more weight than those on a high-glycemic diet; a separate study of obese children produced similar findings. In a larger study, of men, a high-glycemic diet was associated with being bigger around the middle.

The low-glycemic label indicates that a food ranks between 1 and 55 on the glycemic scale. The scale assigns foods a ranking of 0 to 100 based on how much, and how quickly, they cause blood sugar to rise and fall: zero for meat, eggs and most vegetables; around 10 for whole milk and chickpeas and other legumes; and as high as 100 for highly processed baked goods such as doughnuts, croissants and pancakes. A food’s glycemic-index ranking reflects, among other things, the type of starch it contains, how much fat and fiber is in it, and how processed it is. A low-glycemic food is typically high in fiber, low in fat, and not processed.

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